AES 2020

74th Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society

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ABOUT AES 2020



WELCOME TO AES 2020



The Annual Meeting of the American Epilepsy Society, organized by the American Epilepsy Society (AES) will take place from 4th December to the 8th December 2020 at the Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington. The conference will cover areas like AES Annual Meeting brings together professionals from around the world who are involved in both research and clinical care for people with epilepsy -  neurologists, epileptologists, neurophysiologists, neuroscientists, neurosurgeons, internists, pediatricians.

As the largest gathering on epilepsy in the world, the American Epilepsy Society's Annual Meeting is the event for epilepsy professionals in academia, clinical practice, industry, and advocacy.

AES Seattle 2020 is organized annually. 7500 guests are anticipated to visit AES Seattle 2020 this year. This Meeting is organized by American Epilepsy Society. Let Seattle must do attractions make you fall in love with this city when you are there for AES Seattle 2020.



Future Meetings-



December 3-7, 2021 - McCormick Place, Chicago, IL

December 2-6, 2022 - Music City Center, Nashville, TN

December 1-5, 2023 - Orange County Convention Center, Orlando, FL

December 6-10, 2024 - Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, CA



Venue:



Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington

705 Pike St. , Seattle, Washington, United States Of America



 

December 04

8:30 AM

Friday, December 04, 2020



    Career Skills: Caring for a Diverse Patient Population



    8:30 AM-9:45 AM

    Clinicians care for a diverse population of patients, which requires careful attention to how implicit biases may impact the quality of care. This session will specifically address those biases and practice inconsistencies in caring for patients from diverse populations. It will include speakers and panelists who will discuss how implicit biases may impact clinical care, and provide recommendations on how clinicians can provide better care for patients from all backgrounds.



    Career Skills: How to Give a Chalk Talk



    8:30 AM-9:45 AM

    “Chalk Talks” are an integral part of the interview process for research-oriented faculty positions at many institutions, particularly in basic science departments. An hour-long chalk talk is an in-depth presentation of near-future research plans given without using slides, with extensive Q&A throughout. Thus, giving a great chalk talk requires specific preparation and is vital to getting a job offer. In this session, a panel of scientists will discuss common formats, preparation, presentation strategies, and dos/don'ts. The panel will take questions concerning chalk talks and the academic application/interview process.



    Epilepsy Specialist Symposium: Interictal Epileptiform Activity and Its Meaning



    8:30 AM-11:30 AM

    This symposium appraises the meaning of interictal activity. It examines whether interictal epileptiform discharges (IED) are predictive of seizures and whether IED can be used to determine the seizure onset zone or predict outcome after epilepsy surgery. It will also inform about the interaction of IED and cognition.



    Career Pathways Panel: Clinical Care Emphasis



    10:00 AM-11:15 AM

    The Clinical Care Emphasis panel will highlight a breadth of career options in private practice, industry, government, and other sectors. Panelists will describe their work in a panel discussion, followed by breakout sessions with attendees to provide advice and answer questions. This session is one of three parallel Career Pathways panels offered simultaneously for clinical care, research, and interprofessional careers. Participants may go between sessions, which will take place in adjacent rooms.



    Career Pathways Panel: Interprofessional Careers Emphasis



    10:00 AM-11:15 AM

    The Interprofessional Careers panel will highlight a breadth of career paths including clinical, research, teaching, administration, and other settings for advanced practice providers. Panelists will describe their work in a panel discussions, seek attendee participation, as well as answer any questions. This session is one of three parallel Career Pathways panels offered simultaneously for clinical care, research, and interprofessional careers. Participants may go between sessions, which will take place in adjacent rooms.

    The organizers would like to hear from the APP audience on priority topics and professional areas for discussion.



    Career Pathways Panel: Research Emphasis



    10:00 AM-11:15 AM

    The Research Emphasis panel will highlight a breadth of career options in academia, industry, government, and other sectors. The session will include the panelists describing their career trajectory and their present position. This will be followed by breakout sessions where the panelists will engage in more in-depth conversations and field questions from attendees at each table. This session is one of three parallel Career Pathways panels offered simultaneously for clinical care, research, and interprofessional careers. Participants may go between sessions, which will take place in adjacent rooms.



    Annual Fundamentals Symposium: Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures: From Challenges to Practical Management



    12:30 PM-3:00 PM

    This session is meant to be an educational symposium that is mainly targeted to a clinical audience but will cover the fundamentals of PNES, including the diagnostic challenges, understanding the pathogenic mechanisms, communicating the diagnosis, and treatment (from evidence to practice). Following a series of brief lectures by experts, this session will close with an interactive panel discussion with experts in the field to discuss the challenges and opportunities in front of us.



    Epilepsy Fellowship Program Director's Meeting



    1:00 PM-3:00 PM

    The purpose of the Fellowship Directors Program is to provide educational resources and interchange of ideas between Epilepsy and Clinical Neurophysiology fellowship program directors. This meeting also serves to fulfill a requirement for program directors from ACGME accredited programs to attend a program director meeting at a national meeting in the field or subspecialty. For the 2020 meeting, we will discuss a potential match process for prospective fellows in Epilepsy, review fellow recruitment and challenges, review and learn about strategies to improve wellness and reduce burnout in our trainees and incorporation



    SIG: Epidemiology: Epidemiology in Action: Findings that Change Practice



    1:30 PM-3:00 PM

    Several recent findings in epilepsy epidemiology have direct relevance to clinical practice. Key findings about the hit rate of genetic tests, the frequency of comorbidities, and the risk of SUDEP impact clinical decision about what tests clinicians send, how they counsel people with epilepsy and their families, and what screening tools they use at routine visits. The session this year will include an exploration of this topic with relevant examples.



    SIG: Global Health: Fostering Collaboration Within Global Health



    1:30 PM-3:00 PM

    The SIG will start with presentation and a discussion of the results of a recently published systemic review of global health and epilepsy. This will be followed by an introduction and discussion of the newly created ILAE Web based database for Global Health projects. The SIG will include a presentation by Dr. Ed Trevathan on epilepsy care for "the other 50%," and Dr. Omar Siddiqi will discuss his work on epilepsy care in Zambia.



    SIG: Pregnancy Registries: Emerging Data from The International Pregnancy Registries and Neurodevelopmental Studies



    1:30 PM-3:00 PM

    The Pregnancy Registry SIG will continue to present the latest updates from the largest international registries, as well as from the most prominent neurodevelopmental studies. We plan to complement the registries' focus on structural teratogenicity with the newest information on cognitive teratogenicity of the AEDs available, information that takes decades to be incorporated into guidelines leading to a dangerous gap in our clinical practice.



    SIG: Private Practice Epilepsy: The Shifting Sands of Epilepsy: Navigating Changes in Reimbursement



    1:30 PM-3:00 PM

    Recent proposed changes by CMS and AMA to office visit and EEG reimbursement has the potential to dramatically change the practice management for private practice epileptologists. Private practice experts will share the most up-to-date modifications in these revenue streams. Speakers will address rationale and likely outcomes of these adjustments. A group discussion will follow to share ideas for next steps in clinical practice.



    Spanish Symposium: Neuromodulation for Treatment of Medically-refractory Epilepsy



    3:30 PM-6:00 PM

    This symposium will review the different neuromodulation therapies used to treat medically refractory epilepsy and how to determine the best candidate for each of these modalities. The speakers will describe how to define medically-refractory epilepsy; review the work-up required to determine if a patient is a good candidate for neuromodulation; assess which of the modalities is the most appropriate based on the epilepsy syndrome; and describe vagal nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation and responsive brain stimulation.



    17th Judith Hoyer Lecture in Epilepsy



    4:00 PM-5:30 PM



    Basic Science Skills Workshop: Chronic In Vivo Recording: Single Unit to iEEG



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    Given that epilepsy is a disease that arises in living brains, understanding network properties in the intact subject is an essential step towards deciphering the complex dynamics of seizures and of co-morbidities. These dynamics are system-level mechanisms that can be targeted, just like receptors can be targeted with drugs. Novel therapeutic targets can be sought with chronic in vivo recordings in the brain. Techniques that seek to detect and understand these complex neuronal properties are challenging, both in terms of experimental issues and analytical approaches.



    Basic Science Skills Workshop: Single Cell Approaches to Study Cellular Diversity



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    Exciting new technologies are emerging that allow analysis of the properties of individual cells with increasing ease. With the diverse cell populations that make up the brain, embracing this complexity can provide new insight into brain function and dysfunction. In this workshop, we will describe novel single-cell approaches to understand cellular complexity including single cell RNAseq, genomics, and more. The workshop will also include a hands on component to give participants experience in the environments used to analyze single-cell RNAseq data using a sample data set.



    SIG: Clinical Epilepsy for the Advanced Practice Provider: Case Review: Challenging Management Cases in the Epilepsy Clinic



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    Three APP speakers will present challenging clinical cases highlighting a unique diagnosis and treatment technique: pediatric and adult cases involving medical, surgical and genetic therapies included.



    SIG: EEG: The Future of the Stat EEG



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    The common use of computer networks for the transfer of EEG data files now allows for immediate inpatient and emergency department EEG interpretations. With this, physicians in emergency departments and intensive care units now expect EEG testing to be more readily available and that a subspecialist will provide an EEG interpretation as care decisions are being made, regardless of the time and day.



    SIG: Genetics: Precision Medicine for Genetic Epilepsies: Fake News?



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    Precision medicine' is a term frequently used in reference to therapies for genetic epilepsies, but what is it and has it arrived? If not, why not and what will it take to get there? In this SIG we are planning a lively debate regarding the reality of precision medicine (PM) in the current era of accelerated genomic discoveries. Precision medicine has been declared in several instances, but there is a sense that we are far from where we need to be.



    SIG: MEG/MSI: Indications and Contraindications for MEG in Epilepsy Patients



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    Despite its acceptance as part of the standard of care and its routine clinical use in epilepsy centers where it is available, magnetoence phalography remains mysterious to most neurologists - and even to many epileptologists. In particular, they are puzzled as to when MEG can be very helpful, and in which cases MEG is unlikely to add any additional information. Even beyond a misunderstanding of the indications themselves, apprehension and a lack of knowledge regarding the technical aspects has led to the perception that there are many limitations of MEG, most.



    SIG: Neuropsychology: Cognitive Rehabilitation in Epilepsy



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    Cognitive deficits are prevalent in individuals with epilepsy and negatively impact functional capacity and quality of life. Further, a substantial proportion of those with pharmacoresistant epilepsy experience clinically significant declines in cognitive functions, such as memory and language, following epilepsy surgery. Patients are often referred for speech therapy or cognitive rehabilitation to treat these deficits and improve function. Yet, to date, there is little empirical evidence for the efficacy of such interventions in epilepsy; and almost no evidence in children.



    SIG: Seizures in Autoimmune Encephalitis: Seizures and Epilepsy Accompanying Neuroimmunological Disorders



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    This year’s SIG will discuss clinical manifestations and EEG patterns in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. It will also address treatment protocols for refractory status epilepticus in patients with autoimmune encephalitis by discussing illustrative cases. Finally we will conclude with audience participation via questions and answers.



    SIG: SUDEP: New Technologies to Capture the Physiological Changes and Novel Interventions



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    The substrates and triggers for SUDEP remain unknown; the events leading up to SUDEP are often not captured. This session will include a review of novel technologies for capturing the physiological changes (e.g., autonomic, serotonergic, and cardiac) surrounding non-fatal and fatal seizures, and recent therapeutic interventions. In addition, this session will review recent pathological markers for SUDEP identified using novel technologies. Talks will include recent translational studies that apply computational approaches, accelerometry, ECGs, videos, and multimodal technologies to characterize the physiological state and postictal changes associated with SUDEP



     

8:30 AM - 7:30 PM

Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington

December 05

7:00 AM

Saturday, December 05, 2020



    Career Skills: How to Negotiate



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    Negotiation skills can help you access the job and the resources that will allow you to thrive and succeed throughout your career. This session will focus on advice and training for those seeking new employment opportunities in any sector of epilepsy with overall advice on negotiation principles and discussion and Q&A with an expert panel of senior epilepsy professionals.



    SIG: Basic Mechanisms and Neuroscience: Tauopathies and Epileptogenesis: Cause or Correlation?



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    Neurological disorders with increased burden of phosphorylated Tau, e.g. Alzheimer's Disease, are characterized by neuronal hyperexcitability and elevated lifetime risk of seizures. Vice versa, recent work suggests that reducing Tau burden in animal models of epilepsy decreases neuronal excitability and inhibits seizures. These studies suggest that drugs targeting Tau could be therapeutic in epilepsy. Despite this progress in the field, the underlying mechanisms are unclear, and it is controversial if Tau hyperphosphorylation is cause or consequence of seizures, or both.



    SIG: Children's Hour: Big Debates Over Small Matters in Pediatric Epilepsy



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    This SIG will be in the form of a debate covering two topics that come up repeatedly in the pediatric epilepsy clinic. We shall have 2 speakers talk about the data for and against each of these topics for 12-13 minutes each. The first topic is on the role of sports in epilepsy – should Johnny be allowed to play sports if he has epilepsy? (Are there safe sports and for which epilepsy types?).



    SIG: Data Science in Epilepsy: Effective Data Visualization



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    Data visualization is nothing new. In the past two decades, the newly coined term of Data Science has emerged to encompass portions of a number of overlapping fields including psychology, mathematics, engineering, computer science, statistics, and of course artificial intelligence/machine learning. Today there is more data than ever, and more advanced ways to process this data into useful information. That sounds like a good thing.



    SIG: Epilepsy and Aging: Medical and Surgical Outcomes in Older Adults with Epilepsy



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    As our epilepsy patients continue to age, there is a pressing need to better understand how older adults with epilepsy respond to a variety of medical and surgical treatments. In particular, despite a substantial increase in the number of older adults with drug-resistant epilepsy who are candidates for resective surgery, there is little data documenting their outcomes. In this SIG, we will discuss the risks and benefits of epilepsy surgery in older adults, including current data on seizure and cognitive outcomes.



    SIG: Ictal Semiology: Case Studies in Seizure Semiology



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    In this SIG, clinical cases are presented in videos of seizures to illustrate how seizure semiology can be used in the localization of seizure onset and routes of ictal propagation. The panel and the audience are challenged in the detailed examination of seizure semiology with 4-6 cases of typical or unusual seizures.In addition, clinical responses to cortical stimulation will be presented to further elucidate eloquent areas of the brain in relationship to seizure semiology.The audience is invited to examine the seizures and stimulation responses to form hypotheses.



    SIG: Scientific Publishing: Class IV Studies, Meta-analyses, Meta-syntheses Scope and limitations



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    National and international treatment guidelines and meta-analysis increasingly rely on formal quality appraisals of publications. We will discuss if and when there is still a role for class IV publications and how such publications should be read and used.Meta-analyses and meta-syntheses are highly ranked in the hierarchy of scientific publication, but the methodology of these methods of summarising evidence and answering research questions has important limitations and is sometimes misapplied altogether.



    Presidential Symposium: Evidence-Based Treatment for Women with Epilepsy During Reproductive Years: 15 Years of Progress and Future Directions



    8:45 AM-11:45 AM

    The reproductive years are a critical time in the lifespan of a female with epilepsy. Treatment choices should be made with consideration of safety during a future potential pregnancy, planned or unplanned. Fortunately, data from animal preclinical studies, pharmacokinetic modeling, detailed observational prospective studies, and large-scale pregnancy registries have provided an abundance of findings, permitting evidence-based treatment of women with epilepsy during pregnancy. The goal is to maintain maternal health and seizure control while minimizing fetal risk for adverse outcomes such as major congenital malformations and neurodevelopmental abnormalities.



    Poster Session 1



    12:00 PM-6:00 PM

    Posters are grouped by general topic category at various times throughout the meeting. Poster authors are available for discussion. In addition, the following special poster sessions offer additional times to interact with authors.



    Best Practices in Clinical Epilepsy: Challenges in the Care of Patients with Intractable Epilepsy



    2:15 PM-4:45 PM

    Challenges arise to providing comprehensive care for persons with intractable epilepsy, particularly in quality of life, epilepsy diets, use of CBD, surgical options, and psychosocial/mental health and neurocognitive functioning. This symposium will provide general knowledge on care for patients with intractable epilepsy in the above domains and practical solutions for addressing challenges in these domains relevant to providing comprehensive epilepsy care. Mixed didactic with case-based presentations followed by questions and answer format with the speaker panel.



    Concurrent Platform Sessions



    2:15 PM-4:30 PM

    Three concurrent sessions highlighting selected key scientific abstracts consisting of author presentations followed by Q&A.



    Investigators Workshop: Neurostimulation and Neuroimaging of Subcortical Arousal Circuits in Epilepsy



    2:30 PM-4:00 PM

    This workshop will address new exciting data and techniques for imaging networks and uncovering mechanisms of therapeutic modulation by subcortical stimulation devices in epilepsy. We will provide a comprehensive update of the neuroscience of arousal and consciousness as a general field, and as applied to epileptic seizure networks, in the context of other altered states such as anesthesia, coma or sleep.



    Investigators Workshop: Recent Advances in Microelectrode Array Technology and Its Applications



    2:30 PM-4:00 PM

    This workshop will address emerging microelectrode array (MEA) technologies and their applications. Transparent electrode arrays are of interest to many researchers who work on in vivo neuronal imaging and optogenetic stimulation. In addition, in late 2018, the novel, extremely high density silicon electrode array, “Neuropixels”, became available to the general research community. Emerging innovations are not limited to the forefront of in vivo electrophysiology. Advanced materials and increased computational capability have pushed the limit of conventional MEA concepts also into in vitro assay systems.



    Investigators Workshop: Seizures in Seniors: How Do We Identify New and Innovative Therapies for this Growing Patient Demographic?



    2:30 PM-4:00 PM

    This workshop will address the specific therapeutic needs of the fastest growing patient demographic with epilepsy diagnosis: the elderly. Despite the greater incidence of epilepsy in the elderly, as well as the overlapping pathology and increased risk of seizures in patients with Alzheimer’s disease, aged animal models are infrequently used to support antiseizure drug development. This workshop will discuss the pros and cons associated with the identification of therapeutic targets, innovation of preclinical models of aging-related seizures, and the application of comprehensive clinical pharmacology to improve therapeutic management and outcomes



    Investigators Workshop: Wearable Devices: Beyond Seizure Detection



    2:30 PM-4:00 PM

    This workshop will address the application of available wearable devices to novel uses beyond simple seizure detection and alerting and discuss ongoing research to leverage available technology to better understand seizure risk,aid in epilepsy diagnosis and dynamically assess disease comorbidities.



    Epilepsy Therapies Symposium: Neurostimulation for Epilepsy: Which, When, Where and How?



    5:30 PM-8:00 PM

    There are now several options available for treating refractory epilepsy with neurostimulation. It can be difficult to decide when to use each one. We will briefly present a case, followed by presentations on the multiple clinically available neurostimulation modalities: responsive neurostimulation, deep brain stimulation, and vagus nerve stimulation. There will then be a presentation on what practicing neurologists should know about the FDA device clearance process.



    Translational Research Symposium: Advances in Translation for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Antiepileptogenesis



    5:30 PM-8:00 PM

    This symposium focuses on the current state of research on Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Antiepileptogenesis with particular emphasis on the challenges, achievements and possible solutions for translating ideas into therapies. This sesion will provide an overview of the challenges of translating basic findings to clinical utility in this specific domain of epilepsy research with speakers giving up-to-date reviews of the state of knowledge from both animal and clinical studies; a debate format discussion of the utility of animal work in pre-clinical research; an update on EpiBioS4Rx.



     

7:00 AM - 8:00 PM

Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington

December 06

8:30 AM

Sunday, December 06, 2020



    Annual Course: Diagnosis and Management of Epilepsy as a Network Disorder



    8:45 AM-5:15 PM

    The Annual Course will tackle the state-of-the-art knowledge and thought processes related to the growing appreciation of epilepsy as a disorder of brain networks. Through a series of case presentations, didactic lectures, and debates, thought leaders will discuss diagnostic methods and management strategies that address epilepsy and its co-morbidities.



    Investigators Workshop: Circuit Based Therapies in Epilepsy



    8:45 AM-10:15 AM

    This workshop will address novel circuit therapies in epilepsy. Conventional systemic antiepileptic drug therapy immerses the entire brain, affecting both normal and pathogenic circuits, causing both therapeutic and negative outcomes. In addition, the neuronal circuit disruptions underlying phenotypic expression in epilepsy are mechanistically complex. Targeting individual symptoms has proven insufficiently effective in ameliorating seizures or restoring cognitive function in chronic epilepsy.



    Investigators Workshop: Gut Microbiome and Epilepsy: Paradigm Shifting Advances for Understanding and Treating Epilepsy



    8:45 AM-10:15 AM

    This workshop will address the timely and emerging topic of the role of the gut microbiota in epilepsy. Several publications within last year reported intriguing findings suggesting that intestinal microbiome may play a key role in epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders in mice. The role of the microbiome and gut-brain interactions have never been discussed at previous IW workshops. Here, we will discuss the role of the gut microbiome in the development of epilepsy and the potential implications of these discoveries for treatment.



    Investigators Workshop: Novel Approaches to the Treatment of Epilepsy Caused by Periventricular Nodular Heterotopia (PNH)



    8:45 AM-10:15 AM

    This workshop will address the treatment of refractory focal epilepsy caused by PNH , a neuronal migration disorder in which nodules of gray matter are often found in posterior head regions, near ventricles. Patients have been investigated with intracerebral electrodes and epileptogenic regions found in the nodules and in overlying or adjacent cortex. We will review recent EEG and MRI-based functional connectivity studies demonstrating that the nodules are interconnected and are connected to cortex.



    Poster Session 2



    10:00 AM-4:00 PM

    Posters are grouped by general topic category at various times throughout the meeting. Poster authors are available for discussion. In addition, the following special poster sessions offer additional times to interact with authors.



    Investigators Workshop: Gene Therapy for Developmental Epileptic Encephalopathies



    10:30 AM-12:00 PM

    This workshop will address the number of unique genetic etiologies causing developmental epileptic encephalopathies continues to expand. Treatment with disease specific small molecule therapies is slowly improving seizure control but not treating the fundamental pathophysiology underlying these disorders.  Gene therapy has moved into clinical practice in a few neurologic disorders and is poised to do so in multiple other disorders including the developmental epileptic encephalopathies.



    Investigators Workshop: Hot Topics from Young Investigators in the Epilepsy Community



    10:30 AM-12:00 PM

    This session will highlight presentations from young investigators conducting basic, translational, or clinical epilepsy research.



    Topics include:



    SINEUPs: A Novel Therapeutic Strategy for STXBP1 Encephalopathy Based On Non-Coding RNA - Preliminary In Vitro Studies, Ganna Balagura, MD, PhD Candidate

    MRI Structural Heterogeneity Within and Across Focal Cortical Dysplasia: A Data-driven Approach Based on Consensus Clustering, Hyo Min Lee, MS, PhD Candidate

    Measuring Drug Effects on Brain Dynamics Through Electroencephalography, Aarti Sathyanarayana, BS, MS, PhD

    Abnormal Synchronization of Glutamate and Branched-chain Amino Acids in the Epileptic Hippocamus of an Animal Model



    Investigators Workshop: New Approaches and Challenges to Modeling Brain Networks Using Large Neuroimaging Databases: Experiences from ENIGMA-Epilepsy and the Epilepsy Connectome Project



    10:30 AM-12:00 PM

    This workshop will address unique challenges and opportunities related to using large imaging databases to identify common structural and functional brain network alterations in epilepsy. We will rationalize approaches to data harmonization, network modeling, and statistical approaches that have been employed in the two largest epilepsy imaging projects worldwide —the ENIGMA-Epilepsy Consortium and the Epilepsy Connectome Project, and demonstrate how these datasets can provide a new platform for mechanistic and clinical translational discoveries.



    Investigators Workshop Poster Session and Lunch



    12:00 PM-1:30 PM

    Highly scored abstracts submitted in the basic, translational, and clinical epilepsy research categories.



    Poster Walking Tours



    12:15 PM-2:00 PM

    Tours of selected posters led by leading experts in various topic areas.



    Investigators Workshop: On Melancholia in Epilepsy: Mechanistic Insights into the Comorbidity of Epilepsy with Depression and Anxiety



    1:30 PM-3:00 PM

    This workshop will address recent translationally relevant mechanistic insights into the occurrence of mood and anxiety disorders in persons with epilepsy, which contribute substantially to disability and impairments in quality of life and which remain a key NINDS/AES research benchmark. We will emphasize preclinical developments in our understanding of the shared anatomical, cellular and molecular substrates that may predispose individuals to epilepsy and comorbid mood/anxiety disorders. Following our presentations, we will host a discussion that will revolve around strategies for risk stratification and treatment.



    Investigators Workshop: Poison Exons: From Development and Disease to Therapeutic Target



    1:30 PM-3:00 PM

    This workshop will address the role of poison exons in neuronal development, in the development of genetic epilepsies through aberrant splicing, and as potential therapeutic targets for genetic epilepsies. Poison exons, or nonsense mediated decay (NMD) exons, are small exonic regions that when spliced into an RNA transcript lead to premature truncation of a protein. Inclusion of poison exons occurs during specific times in neurodevelopment and splicing occurs in a cell-specific manner.



    Investigators Workshop: Seeing the Forest or the Trees: Does Synaptic and Cellular Heterogeneity Support Pathological Network Activity Level?



    1:30 PM-3:00 PM

    This workshop will address how epilepsy researchers and clinicians can integrate emerging knowledge of synaptic, transcriptional, and circuit heterogeneity in a disease defined by highly stereotyped and synchronous electrical activity. Is there meaningful diversity in how individual synapses participate in seizure? Are rare cells types or cells that differ from the norm in their transcriptional profile important contributors to disease pathology? We will discuss these ideas and present cutting edge genetic and electrophysiological tools which allow appreciation of the heterogeneity of electrical, molecular, and transcriptional signaling



    Investigators Workshop: Electrographic Seizures in Acute Brain Injury: Prediction, Significance, and Association with Epileptogenesis



    3:15 PM-4:45 PM

    This workshop will address the emerging topic of continuous EEG monitoring after acute brain injury focusing on the detection and significance of electrographic seizures as well as the link between continuous EEG findings early in the course of brain injury and the eventual developed of post-injury epilepsy.



    Investigators Workshop: Oligonucleotide Therapies for Epilepsy: A New Era in Precision Medicine?



    3:15 PM-4:45 PM

    This workshop will address the topic of oligonucleotide-based therapies for the treatment of epilepsy. Oligonucleotides are artificial DNA sequences which work by binding to target RNAs (e.g. mRNA) to disrupt their function. This IW will focus on exploring this nascent field in epilepsy, which offers virtually unlimited potential to treat genetic and acquired epilepsies and is now moving to clinical trials. It will provide an over-view of the state of the art, specific use of OGNs in distinct forms of epilepsy and span the pipeline from proof-of-concept to clinical trials



    Investigators Workshop: Ultra-slow and DC Recordings to Study Seizures, Migraine, and Spreading Depression



    3:15 PM-4:45 PM

    This workshop will address how ultra-slow changes in membrane potential and extracellular voltage may reveal common mechanisms that link epileptic seizures with migraine. Migraine is a comorbidity of epilepsy, and spreading depression is thought to contribute to both migraine and epileptic seizures (e.g., postictal depression). During spreading depression, neurons and glia undergo prolonged depolarization. The workshop will show how DC recordings are required to measure directly the ultra-slow components of spreading depression and postictal depression, and will discuss new techniques that can be used chronically in animal models and clinically



    Poster Session: Contributions of a Diverse Professional Community



    5:15 PM-6:45 PM

    Please join AES over refreshments to highlight and celebrate the work of professionals who identify with or investigate underrepresented members of the epilepsy community. This is an additional poster session to celebrate the value of diversity in both the workforce and the patient community. This session provides selected abstract authors with an extra opportunity to showcase their work and network.



    CDC Public Health Workshop: Successful Strategies to Facilitate Transition of Youth with Epilepsy into Adult Health Care



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    This session will include speakers from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Epilepsy Program. HRSA supports strategic approaches to improving access to quality health care for children and youth with epilepsy. It will highlight successful strategies to facilitate the transition of youth with epilepsy into adult health care.



    SIG: Engineering and Neurostimulation: Focusing on Fast Oscillations: New Insights and Controversies



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    Two decades of research on interictal fast oscillations (80-600Hz) have generated an abundance of data supporting the hypothesis that fast oscillations are an electromagnetic biomarker of epileptogenic brain tissue. Yet translating this basic research into clinical practice has been slow due in part to a partial understanding of the pathophysiology of fast oscillations in the epileptic brain and various issues associated with recording, detecting, and analyzing these data.



    SIG: Neonatal Seizures: Outcomes Following Neonatal Seizures



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    This session is intended to highlight the current level of knowledge regarding outcomes in children who experience neonatal seizures. While it is known that an increasing electrographic seizure burden is associated with poor neurodevelopment outcomes, it is important to explore and understand this relationship. We will also discuss other influences and confounding factors on outcomes following neonatal seizures, such as etiology and co-morbid health problems, as well as the role of anti-seizure medications. We will specifically discuss outcomes of genetic neonatal onset epilepsy.



    SIG: Neuroendocrinology: Going 'Downstream' of Endogenous Steroids for New Therapeutic Approaches



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    Gonadal steroids often target specific genes or intracellular signaling pathways to exert their biological effects. Therapeutic strategies that focus on these 'downstream' targets are potentially attractive because they may circumvent the side effects of hormone therapy. There are several target genes that are good candidates and this session will focus on one: the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). This focus is timely because of increasing evidence that BDNF and its receptors, p75 and TrkB, are involved in epilepsy.



    SIG: Psychosocial Comorbidities: Psychosis and Epilepsy



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    In this year's SIG, we plan to focus on psychosis as it occurs in patients with epilepsy. Dr. Salpekar will address interictal psychosis in both its chronic and transient/episodic forms and Dr. Kanner will discuss peri-ictal psychosis (ictal, post-ictal). We will address the chronic schizophrenia-like psychoses of epilepsy, anti-seizure drug-induced psychosis, and forced normalization. All topics will be addressed with a focus on the phenomenology and etiology as best understood.



    SIG: Seizure and Cerebrovascular Disease: Review of the Latest Updates on Epidemiology and Management of Post-Stroke Seizures



    6:00 PM-7:30 PM

    Epidemiology and management strategies of seizures following ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes are constantly evolving as newly published data becomes available. We selected three prominent speakers of this field to present updates on their research on novel data regarding:

    Epidemiology of treatment-resistant (refractory) stroke-related epilepsy including risk factors, response to medical management and other treatment options

    Impact of seizure medication choice on quality of life and cognitive functions after strokes

    Early post-stroke seizures: their incidence and their contribution to stroke outcome and post-stroke epilepsy, and the effect of acute stroke treatment.



     

8:30 AM - 7:30 PM

Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington

December 07

7:00 AM

Monday, December 07, 2020



    SIG: Critical Care Epilepsy: Quantitative and Automated CEEG Analysis



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    Continuous EEG monitoring (CEEG) has become standard of care in many institutions worldwide. Yet it still poses many challenges. One of them is the daunting amount of EEG data that need to be reviewed by clinicians in a very tight time frame. This year's Critical Care Epilepsy SIG will focus on new and emerging methods of quantitative and automated methods of EEG signal analysis that might allow better and faster CEEG interpretation for diagnostic and prognostic purposes, including deep learning algorithms, advanced signal decomposition, and EEG sonification.



    SIG: Dietary Therapies for Epilepsy: Patient Monitoring and Biological Mechanisms: Point-Counterpoint Discussion



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    This session proposes to discuss a range of topics that are relevant to patient monitoring on the ketogenic diet and will consider dietary management issues, especially in regards to transitioning the pediatric patient to adult care. The format for the clinical presentation will be in a point-counterpoint style discussion from experience clinicians on a range of topics including:

    when should a pediatric neurologist continue (or wean) a patient as they approach adulthood or when should an adult neurologist discontinue the diet

    how to start a referral process for those patients



    SIG: Epilepsy Education: Building a Career as an Epilepsy Educator



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    This year's SIG will focus on building a career as an epilepsy educator. We will approach this according to the phases of career development, beginning with how to build the skills necessary to become an outstanding educator. Thereafter, the SIG will cover how to identify and cultivate an area of expertise. Finally, we will explore how to develop a National and International reputation and a portfolio to support advancement. Participants in this SIG should come away with practical tips for their own career development as educators regardless of the phase



    SIG: Professional Wellness in Epilepsy Care



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    The session will include 'didactic' and 'interactive' elements. This will consolidate the favorable feedback from the very first of this type of SIG in 2018 and incorporate suggested new ideas, The featured speaker will be Pulitzer Prize winner Michael Vitez from Temple University on Narrative Medicine in epilepsy caregivers with an update on the preliminary data presented at the AES in 2018. Cormac O'Donovan will discuss the dynamics and importance of teamwork and emotional culture in the workplace and its relevance to reducing burnout and increasing professional fulfillment in Epilepsy



    SIG: Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures (PNES): Where is the Silver Lining in Psychogenic Non-epileptic Seizures? Mortality, Disability, Symptom Substitution, Variable Treatment Responses



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are paroxysmal behavioral changes that resemble epileptic seizures but are not associated with electrophysiological epileptic changes. However, simply because psychological factors are at the root of this condition, does not mean it is trivial or less onerous than other physiological disorders. This year's SIG will address prognosis in PNES, including the issue of mortality.



    SIG: Stereo electroencephalography (SEEG): Anatomo-electro-clinical Correlation in Practice: The Use of Semiology and Multi-modal Investigations to Guide Implantation and Interpretation of Stereo electroencephalography (SEEG)



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    The purpose of this year's SIG is to discuss implantation planning guided by integration of the pre-surgical data including video EEG and multi-modal imaging. Through a methodological approach, we will discuss SEEG electrode implantation strategies. The vital importance of anatomo-electro-clinical correlation in generating hypotheses will be emphasized. Finally, we will discuss the interpretation of SEEG in the light of anatomo-electro-clinical correlation and the epileptogenic zone biomarkers. We will highlight the relation between interictal and ictal activities as well as the role of electrical stimulation.



    Poster Session 3



    8:00 AM-2:00 PM

    Posters are grouped by general topic category at various times throughout the meeting. Poster authors are available for discussion. In addition, the following special poster sessions offer additional times to interact with authors.



    Pediatric State of the Art Symposium: Emergency Seizure Management: Smarter Systems Stop Seizures Sooner



    8:45 AM-11:45 AM

    Recent data have advanced our understanding and management of pediatric epilepsy emergencies. This session will present immediately actionable data-driven changes to optimize care.



    NAEC/AES EEG Monitoring Codes: Coding Changes for Long Term EEG Monitoring Services for 2020



    9:00 AM-10:30 AM

    This session will provide a historical overview of CPT Code 95951 (VEEG) and the other long term EEG monitoring services as well as their review by the AMA CPT Panel and Relative Value Update Committee in 2017/2018. Detailed information will be presented on the new code structure, definitions and appropriate usage in diagnosing and treating patients with epilepsy, and other disorders. The Medicare-assigned relative values and payment rates for the new codes also will be explained.



    SIG: Intractable Generalized Epilepsy: From Genetic Testing to Surgical Approach



    9:00 AM-10:30 AM

    Diagnosing and treating intractable epilepsy can be challenging. Significant progress has been made in the management of fintractable ocal epilepsy but unfortunately, this is not true when it comes to treating intractable generalized epilepsy. This session is intended to provide a platform for discussion of complex approach in the diagnosis of intractable generalized epilepsy from clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) features to a comprehensive approach in the medical or surgical treatment.



    SIG: Neuroimaging: Imaging Genetics Across Epilepsy Syndromes



    9:00 AM-10:30 AM

    Imaging genetics is an integrated research method that uses neuroimaging and genetics to assess the impact of genetic variation on brain function and structure. This session will cover the most recent research on combined MRI and genetics studies in main epilepsy syndromes: temporal lobe epilepsy, focal cortical dysplasia and generalized genetic epilepsies.



    SIG: Practice Management: Multidisciplinary Care Models in Seizures and Epilepsy



    9:00 AM-10:30 AM

    This session showcases multidisciplinary care models implemented by a variety of institutions in the care of patients with seizures and epilepsy. Although epileptologists have a primary role in the management of seizures, a team approach allows for a variety of healthcare professionals to address the comorbidity and complexities that can accompany seizures. The Speakers will focus on the realistic and practical aspects of their multidisciplinary clinics including barriers to implementation, billing and reimbursement, and outcomes. The session will conclude with a panel discussion with audience participation encouraging discussion of other



    SIG: Temporal Lobe Club: The Intracranial EEG Evaluation of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy. Which is Best?



    9:00 AM-10:30 AM

    Several strategies are used for intracranial EEG monitoring to localize the ictal onset zone. Although consensus from the last Palm Desert Conference in 1992 recommended depth electrodes for deep limbic onset seizures and subdural grids and strips for convexity neocortical onset seizures, many surgical centers in the US are now transitioning from using only grids and strips to using only depth electrodes. Moreover, the approach to the use of depth electrodes now is following two strategies: bilateral standard depth electrode placements and tailored stereo EEG.



    SIG: Tumor Related Epilepsy: Diagnostic Advances in Tumor-Related Epilepsy



    9:00 AM-10:30 AM

    This SIG will feature an update on diagnostic advances in Brain Tumor-Related Epilepsy (BTRE), with special attention paid to advances in genetic biomarkers and diagnostic neuro-imaging, and their impact on current and future management and research for both adult and pediatric patients with BTRE.



    WHO-ILAE-IBE Global Report on Epilepsy: Epilepsy: A Public Health Imperative



    9:00 AM-10:30 AM

    This strategic document of the WHO, the ILAE and the IBE addresses global strategic issues in epilepsy treatment and care. It will be presented by the leadership of these organizations.



    Poster Walking Tours



    12:15 PM-2:00 PM

    Tours of selected posters led by leading experts in various topic areas.



    Lombroso Lecture: Glial Cells and Epilepsy: How New Tools Are Revealing New insights



    2:00 PM-3:15 PM

    Technical developments in neuroscience have greatly improved our ability to study the role of astrocytes and microglia in epilepsy. For example, the development of genetically encoded calcium indicating proteins and glutamate sensors have demonstrated that populations of glial cells, in brain regions associated with seizure generation, are not the passive, quiescent cells they were once thought to be. Following brain insults that can lead to the development of epilepsy, glial cells undergo considerable changes in gene expression, structure, and function, and produce inflammatory cytokines which contribute to neural excitability.



    Concurrent Platform Sessions



    3:15 PM-5:30 PM

    Three concurrent sessions highlighting selected key scientific abstracts consisting of author presentations followed by Q&A.



    Dialogues to Transform Epilepsy



    3:15 PM-5:45 PM

    This session, new for 2020, will include two speakers whose work focuses on transformative neurobiological research outside or at the fringe of the epilepsy field, each paired with a member of the AES community to facilitate a dialogue about how the conceptual and/or technical advances of the talk can be implemented into the epilepsy field to accelerate progress.



    Pediatric Epilepsy Highlights Session



    3:15 PM-5:30 PM

    This session showcases scientific abstracts focused on topics in clinical care and research in pediatric epilepsy.



    Merritt-Putnam Symposium: Neuroinflammation in Epilepsy



    5:45 PM-8:15 PM

    Neuroinflammation is known to play important roles in epileptogenesis, epilepsy progression, and the long-term consequences of seizures, in various epilepsy etiologies including genetic and acquired syndromes. These results are now being translated to develop prognostic biomarkers capable of predicting the development of epilepsy, and to identify new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of seizures. This symposium will present an overview of current basic science research, neuroimaging biomarkers of inflammation and their application, and potential new treatment strategies.



     

7:00 AM - 8:15 PM

Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington

December 8

7:00 AM

Tuesday, December 8, 2020



    SIG: Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions for Epilepsy: Knowledge Translation in CBTs for Epilepsy: Dissemination, Implementation, and Treatment Fidelity



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    While the evidence-base for cognitive and behavioral treatments for epilepsy continues to build, comorbidities and disparities in epilepsy persist. Issues at the forefront of psychosocial treatment knowledge translation in epilepsy include dissemination strategy development, implementation support, and fidelity monitoring. The purpose of this SIG session is to briefly explore each of these three issues as via presentations from scientist-practitioner dyads in the fields of mental health and epilepsy self-management, with remaining time dedicated to discussion.



    SIG: Epilepsy Surgery: Great and Desperate Cures



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    Intractable epilepsies sometime necessitate radical approaches outside the realm of the standard approaches. This is particularly true for cases that fail initial surgical intervention, either due to the multifocal nature of the disease, or our failure to completely understand it. In service of alleviating the seizure burden on these patients, creative thinking and innovative approaches may be applied. These approaches must also be balanced against the risk of functional impairments. This SIG will debate on possible approaches to these complex cases that two faculty members will take divergent views on.



    SIG: NIH and Non-Profit Research Resources/Jr Investigator Workshop: How are Grants Reviewed and What Makes a Successful Proposal?



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    Early investigators rely on funding from a variety of sources, including federal and non-profit funding. Understanding how career development grants are reviewed and what elements make for a successful application are critically important for obtaining funding. This session will start with a brief overview of current funding mechanisms intended to support neurology researchers during the early stages of their career (e.g., Epilepsy Foundation, CURE, AAN, and NIH/NINDS K and F awards).



    SIG: Pediatric Epilepsy Case Discussions: Diagnostic and Treatment Challenges



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    For more than 20 years, this session has provided a rare platform for sharing complex challenges in management of pediatric epilepsy. Young and seasoned epileptologists from both academic and private centers worldwide have an opportunity to present an interesting case from their practice. Recent topics discussed in this SIG in the past two years include: SUDEP, ictal semiology of 'chapeau de gendarme', pseudo-frontal epilepsy, precision medicine, neonatal status epilepticus, myoclonic-astatic epilepsy phenotype secondary to temporal dysplasia, CBD in epilepsy, autoimmune epilepsy and refractory ESES.



    SIG: Quality and Safety: Measuring Quality of EEG Interpretation



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    Interpretation of EEG is a challenging skill to acquire, the accuracy of which directly impacts the quality of patient care. Despite multiple boards having existed for decades, there is no restriction on which neurologists may interpret EEGs. This fact has advantages and disadvantages. While board exams offer a measure of interpreter qualification, there is no current standard for assessment of actual interpretation quality; the gold standard remains expert consensus. Research suggests there can be wide variability in the interpretation of a single EEG.



    SIG: Sleep in Epilepsy: Sleep On The Edge: New Techniques for Epilepsy



    7:00 AM-8:30 AM

    This SIG will focus on cutting-edge and emerging methodologies being used to make new discoveries in the exciting field of sleep and epilepsy. First, Dr. Mark Quigg will provide an important update from the newly established AES Sleep and Epilepsy Workgroup. Topics discussed will include the use of quantitative EEG towards the new frontier of sleep in patients with nonconvulsive status epilepticus or along the interictal-ictal-injury continuum in the intensive care unit (Dr. Westover), high density EEG to assess different states of consciousness, such as sleep and dreaming



    Hot Topics Symposium



    8:45 AM-10:45 AM

    The purpose of the Hot Topics Symposium is to present topics of great current interest to the audience of learners. The format is comprised four lectures with time after each presentation for questions from the audience. The topics are selected to reflect issues of current interest to clinicians caring for patients with epilepsy with the goal of improving the care of patients with epilepsy.



    Scientific Symposium: Pharmacogenomics in Epilepsy: Existing and Emerging Opportunities for Intervention



    8:45 AM-10:45 AM

    Recent advances in the understanding of neurobiology of epilepsies have opened avenues for targeted therapies using established as well as novel gene and allele specific interventions. Additionally, greater access to genetic testing and progress in genomic research offer opportunities for a broader application of pharmacogenomics in clinical practice. The symposium will examine progress and challenges facing individualized drug therapies, such as patient selection, clinical trial design, timing, and others.



    Clinical Skills Workshop: Alternative Therapies to Standard Anti-epileptic Therapies: My Seizure Drugs Aren’t Working, Now What?



    11:00 AM-12:30 PM

    Over the last two decades, there has been a rapid expansion in the number and types of available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) so it may be easy to overlook and be skeptical about non?pharmacological treatments. In addition, there is increasing concern amongst parents and caregivers about the unwanted side effects of conventional AEDs, often fueled by the media and the web. With an emphasis on self-management, this skills workshop will focus on the non?conventional (or non?standard) medical treatments, surgical procedures, dietary approaches, and other non?pharmacological treatment approaches



    Clinical Skills Workshop: Genetics Testing in Epilepsy Patients



    11:00 AM-12:30 PM

    Novel detection platforms have accelerated scientific discoveries of genes relevant to patients with epilepsy of all ages. The selection of patients that would most benefit from the genetic investigations, identification of the appropriate tests, and reporting of results are increasingly complex. This skills workshop will review available testing platforms and outline case scenarios driven testing algorithms. The aim is to provide practical clinical guide in selecting patients, testing methods, and the workflow involved in ordering, submitting, and reporting genetic tests.



    Clinical Skills Workshop: Intracranial Electrode Studies: How Do You Choose a Technique for Optimum Localization



    11:00 AM-12:30 PM

    Over the past thirty years, resection for medically intractable epilepsy has become a standard treatment option. However, in many instances successful surgery is not possible without defining the potential respective volume by intracranial electrophysiology. Imaging and stereotactic navigation have made great strides and epilepsy centers have many choices regarding types of electrodes, number of contacts needed and how they are delivered. This is an interactive workshop where 2 to 3 cases are presented illustrating different problems to be solved in defining a region of epileptogenesis.



    Clinical Skills Workshop: Misadventures in EEG



    11:00 AM-12:30 PM

    The EEG remains essential in the care, diagnosis and management of individuals with seizures and spells. The EEG is still the gold standard tool in the diagnosis, classification of spells/ seizure type, and identification of a specific epileptic syndromes. Therefore, making the correct EEG interpretation is essential in the proper diagnosis and prescribing appropriate therapy, and prognostication in the clinical arena. “Over-interpretation” and misinterpretation of EEG remains a well-documented problem in this population .



    Clinical Skills Workshop: Optimal Use of Neuroimaging in Diagnosing and Treating Epilepsy



    11:00 AM-12:30 PM

    Neuroimaging is an essential tool in the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy. It has opened a window on the pathological substrate underlying epilepsy, ranging from subtle gliotic lesions and cortical malformations to larger, more extensive structural disturbances. This workshop will review the techniques used to diagnose epilepsy, emphasizing both basic MRI customized for epilepsy and advanced neuroimaging techniques. We will review a rational approach to the use of neuroimaging and highlight techniques that enhance diagnostic ability. This workshop will also include a practical, hands-on session with review of pre-surgical cases.



    Clinical Skills Workshop: Pearls of VideoEEG Monitoring



    11:00 AM-12:30 PM

    Video EEG monitoring is utilized to establish a diagnosis of epileptic seizures in contrast to other events such as psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. Reading video EEG recordings in contrast to routine EEG is a special skill and requires also interpretation of the video data. Not in all cases of epileptic seizures is the EEG helpful to identify an EEG as epileptic or not. This workshop will educate about identification and classification of events on video EEG monitoring and enhance skills about video EEG interpretation.



    Clinical Skills Workshop: Genetics Testing in Epilepsy Patients



    12:45 PM-2:15 PM

    Novel detection platforms have accelerated scientific discoveries of genes relevant to patients with epilepsy of all ages. The selection of patients that would most benefit from the genetic investigations, identification of the appropriate tests, and reporting of results are increasingly complex. This skills workshop will review available testing platforms and outline case scenarios driven testing algorithms. The aim is to provide practical clinical guide in selecting patients, testing methods, and the workflow involved in ordering, submitting, and reporting genetic tests.



    Clinical Skills Workshop: Intracranial Electrode Studies: How Do You Choose a Technique for Optimum Localization



    12:45 PM-2:15 PM

    Over the past thirty years, resection for medically intractable epilepsy has become a standard treatment option. However, in many instances successful surgery is not possible without defining the potential respective volume by intracranial electrophysiology. Imaging and stereotactic navigation have made great strides and epilepsy centers have many choices regarding types of electrodes, number of contacts needed and how they are delivered. This is an interactive workshop where 2 to 3 cases are presented illustrating different problems to be solved in defining a region of epileptogenesis.



    Clinical Skills Workshop: Neuromodulation in Epilepsy



    12:45 PM-2:15 PM

    Neurostimulation is now an accepted treatment option for patients with refractory epilepsy. Several stimulation devices are approved for patients with epilepsy: the vagus nerve stimulatior (VNS), the responsive neurostimulator (RNS) and the deep brain stimulator (DBS). This workshop will discuss the trials and post-marketing experience that established the tolerability and efficacy of these devices, and instruct on how to use them effectively. Hand-on experience for interrogating and programming the devices will be arranged. After the workshop, participants should be able to identify appropriate patients, understand how implantation is carried out



    Clinical Skills Workshop: Optimal Use of Neuroimaging in Diagnosing and Treating Epilepsy



    12:45 PM-2:15 PM

    Neuroimaging is an essential tool in the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy. It has opened a window on the pathological substrate underlying epilepsy, ranging from subtle gliotic lesions and cortical malformations to larger, more extensive structural disturbances. This workshop will review the techniques used to diagnose epilepsy, emphasizing both basic MRI customized for epilepsy and advanced neuroimaging techniques. We will review a rational approach to the use of neuroimaging and highlight techniques that enhance diagnostic ability. This workshop will also include a practical, hands-on session with review of pre-surgical cases.



    Clinical Skills Workshop: Pearls of Video-EEG Monitoring



    12:45 PM-2:15 PM

    Video EEG monitoring is utilized to establish a diagnosis of epileptic seizures in contrast to other events such as psychogenic none-pileptic seizures. Reading video EEG recordings in contrast to routine EEG is a special skill and requires also interpretation of the video data. Not in all cases of epileptic seizures is the EEG helpful to identify an EEG as epileptic or not. This workshop will educate about identification and classification of events on video EEG monitoring and enhance skills about video EEG interpretation.



    Clinical Skills Workshop: Treating Patients with Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures



    12:45 PM-2:15 PM

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are prevalent and disabling and are often identified in seizure monitoring units. Neurologists readily diagnose PNES, but the majority of providers do not feel equipped to treat patients with PNES. Psychogenic NES present in adults and children with neurologic signs, psychological stressors and comorbid psychiatric disorders. For years, neurologists, psychiatrists and psychologists have accumulated data about NES phenomenology, epidemiology, risks, comorbidities, and prognosis.



     

7:00 AM - 2:15 PM

Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington

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